Anticipated coverage:

Three anticipated coverage maps are attached as follows.

1. Three Rock 106.8mHz anticipated signal strength at a reference height of 10m above ground level, vertical receive antenna.
This anticipated coverage map was generated using a digital terrain database of grid step 500m. The prediction model used considered free space path loss (Fresnel method), multiple knife edge diffraction losses (Deygout 1994)) and 0.8 Fresnel Zone Fraction fine integration sub path occupancy. Clutter heights and losses were not applied. The field strength was predicted for a vertical polarised receiver antenna at a height of 10m from ground level. The coloured field strength contours shown (>=54 dBµV/m, >=60 dBµV/m and >=66 dBµV/m) are the median values predicted for 50% time availability and 50% of locations in the short sector.

2. Three Rock 106.8mHz anticipated stereo coverage.
This anticipated stereo coverage map was generated using a digital terrain database of grid step 500m. The prediction model used considered free space path loss (Fresnel method), multiple knife edge diffraction losses (Deygout 1994)) and 0.8 Fresnel Zone Fraction fine integration sub path occupancy. Based on the BTS knowledge of the greater Dublin area, attenuation has been applied to account for global clutter loss, 5dB local/12dB urban and the receiver antenna in the computer model has been reduced to 1.5m above ground. The coloured field strength contours shown are the median values predicted for 50% time availability and 50% of locations in the short sector for stereo quality signals in rural and urban locations at the operating frequency of 106.8Hz. The base useable signal level contour used in the prediction model of 54dBmV/m or ­63dBm is in practice a conservative figure and most mid price range radio receivers will perform satisfactorily up to just outside the fringe contour areas.

3. Three Rock 106.8mHz anticipated mono coverage.
This anticipated mono coverage map was generated using a digital terrain database of grid step 500m. The prediction model used considered free space path loss (Fresnel method), multiple knife edge diffraction losses (Deygout 1994)) and 0.8 Fresnel Zone Fraction fine integration sub path occupancy. Based on the BTS knowledge of the greater Dublin area, attenuation has been applied to account for global clutter loss, 5dB local/12dB urban and the receiver antenna in the computer model has been reduced to 1.5m above ground. The coloured field strength contours shown are the median values predicted for 50% time availability and 50% of locations in the short sector for mono quality signals in rural and urban locations at the operating frequency of 106.8Hz. The base useable signal level contour used in the prediction model of 48dBmV/m or ­69dBm is in practice a conservative figure and most mid price range radio receivers will perform satisfactorily up to just outside the fringe contour areas.

Antenna:

The antenna will be a Jampro three-tier JLPC circular polarised antenna fitted with parasitic reflectors to achieve the radiation pattern envelope template. Jampro Incorporated will pattern tune this antenna on their test-range in California using a partial replica of the Rock Solid Transmission tower. In addition to the restriction of 19dBW at 90°, Jampro will test and pattern tune the antenna for 27dBW, 24dBW and 21dBw at 90° in anticipation of a relaxation in the 90° restriction being successfully co-ordinated with the spectrum management agencies in Ireland and the UK.

Each antenna tier will be individually fed from the power divider in the transmission building, this will facilitate antenna and tower maintenance and will enable emergency operation into the split tiers should there be an issue with the individual antenna elements or feeders.

The antenna will be side mounted on the 220° ETN tower leg at a mid height of 20m above ground level on a true North heading.

The antenna will be compliant with the ODTR regulations (T&RT 95/10) regarding Vertically Radiated Power, as the vertical aperture is 2.5 wavelengths.

Capital costs

Description

IRŁ

Jampro directional FM Antenna

7,350

FM Feeder cable

1,400

FM Three way power splitter

280

Triple cavity narrow bandpass filter

2,650

Dummy load

Not Applicable, provided on site and included in annual fee

1kWatt FM transmitter

7,500

FM exciter

2,200

Backup 250W transmitter

1,990

RDS Encoder

770

Calibrated Directional coupler

800

Moseley 1.4GHz link receiver

8,950

Andrew 1.4GHz Gridpak link antenna

950

1.4GHz Link feeder cable

650

Omnia - Digital Audio processor

9,500

Grounding straps, ties etc

375

Installation of all equipment

4,600

Air-conditioning

Not Applicable, provided on site and included in annual fee

Standby power supply equipment

Not Applicable, provided on site and included in annual fee

Building

Not Applicable, provided on site and included in annual fee

Tower

Not Applicable, provided on site and included in annual fee

Total Capital Cost

49,965

Annual costs:

Tower & plant room fee IRŁ23,000
Electricity included in annual fee
Air-conditioning included in annual fee
Standby power included in annual fee

Technical expertise:
It is proposed to contract Broadcast Technical Services to install, maintain and monitor all the transmission equipment.

Planning permission:
The site has full and permanent planning permission for multi-user Transmission operation reference: 91A/1206 Dun Laoghaire Rathdown Council.

Variations from assigned transmission characteristics:
The antenna template with the 11dB restriction at 90° is difficult to achieve in practice without considerable knock on degradation at other angles of azimuth. Consequently the radiation pattern is significantly degraded from 30° through to 340°. The Westerly reduction in performance is due to the symmetric transmission pattern response. It is desirable to minimise this Westerly reduction as blocking and desensitising due to the Tallaght Community Radio signal on 107.2mHz will further reduce the penetration of the 106.8mHz signal in the Tallaght area. If the 90° restriction can be relaxed to permit an ERP of 24dBW at 90° then the performance of the antenna system at other angles of azimuth will be greatly improved.


Section 9



Studios and operation

Studio location:

The service will be based in premises of approximately 2,000 square feet , in Dublin city centre with direct line of sight to the transmitter station on Three Rock.
We have been offered two premises of this size, both suitable for our needs and meeting all the relevant criteria. One is on Eastmoreland Place, off Upper Baggot Street, the other off Mount Street. There will be full access and provision for wheelchair and disabled persons throughout either premises. An architects plan of the premesis in Eastmoreland Place is included.
Planning permission for satellite equipment and masts of the roof will be sought.

Studio Facilities:

The facilities are to comprise:
An On-Air Studio, approximately 4.6m x 4.5m This will be used exclusively for on-air output and news bulletins, with access to on-air telephone lines and ISDN lines.
A Production Studio/Back up On-Air studio, approximately 3.7m x 4.7m. This will be used for recording and editing commercial spots, promotional spots and programmes and additionally as an emergency and maintenance backup for the On-Air studio.
A voice booth, approximately 4.0m x 4.2m to be shared with the On-Air and Production studios. This will be equipped with four microphones that will be accessible on the mixer desks in the On-Air and Production studios.
A Racks Room/CTA, approximately 4.6m x 3.0m. This will house the un-interruptable power supply, studio to transmitter links, ISDN equipment, telephone hybrids, PABX, eight second profanity delay, INN satellite equipment, On-Air logging equipment and support equipment.

Studio acoustic construction:

The studios will be designed to have a reverberation time of 0.2 of a second and an internal noise level of no greater than NR25 based on octave band analysis, which complies with international broadcast recommendations.

The studio walls will be a box within a box structure. The studio will be sectioned off from the remainder of the building with a partition that is constructed to fit tightly up to the existing soffit. The studios themselves will be constructed as individual boxes from modified “Camden” partitions that are contained within the outer wall and each of the studios will have its own ceiling joists and isolation ceiling.

The outer barrier wall will be constructed from 75mm x 47mm softwood studs on 400mm centres. The studwork will be clad each side with a 12mm layer of fibreboard and two layers of British Gypsum 15mm Soundbloc Plasterboard. All plasterboard joists are to be butt-jointed on the timber members, staggered, taped and filled. The exposed side of the outer wall is skimmed. This construction exceeds 30 minutes fire rating.

The studio walls will be constructed from similar softwood studs but modified to permit building from one side with 12mm fibreboard and two layers 15mm Soundbloc plasterboard each side. All plasterboard joists are to be butt-jointed on the timber members, staggered, taped and filled.

The fibreboard, which serves to damp the resonance in the plasterboard as well as partially isolating the plasterboard from the timber frame, contributes a significant portion of the mass and therefore increases the sound insulating properties of the partition.

All studio frames will be filled with Rockwool insulation between the facing sheets.

The cavity between the partitions will be blocked at the end of each wall with dense Rockwool to act as a cavity barrier and trimmed with hardwood edging.
All studio and outer walls will have their sole and head plates mounted resiliently from the existing structure using a quality hair felt material and non-setting mastic.
The inside of the studio walls will additionally be clad with softwood framing, Rockwool between the studs and a hardboard covering that is perforated depending on position on the walls to approximately 0.05% or 5% of area to control the acoustics of the room. This hardboard will then be covered with a plastic sheet, dustsheet and a tight weave fabric that is fire treated to class 1 speed of flame.

The ceilings will be constructed from 200mm x 47mm joists spaced at 400mm centres. The underside will be clad with a layer of 12mm fibreboard and two layers of 15mm Soundbloc Plasterboard. The cavity between the joists will be filled with 100mm Rockwool insulation. A suspended acoustic ceiling will be fitted in the studios and sound lobby underneath the plasterboard ceiling.

Windows:

Vision windows having-sound resisting properties complementary to the wall structures will be installed where required. All sound resisting windows will be double glazed with three-ply laminated glass and angled to minimise internal visual and sound reflections.

Doors:

Sound-resisting doors will be supplied and installed to the studios and have a natural wood finish. All sound-resisting doors will be fitted with vision panels and will be supplied complete with frame and overhead door closer, magnetic seals and stainless steel pull handle and push plate. They will have a sound reduction rating of 45dB (SR).

Air-conditioning and ventilation:

All studios will be provided with cooling only air conditioning services. Due to the insulating properties of the studios and the amount of equipment operational in each one, heating will not be required. As the windows will not be opened and to maintain acceptable levels of oxygen and to contain decoration and equipment soiling the air-conditioning system will also provide approximately 20 Litres of fresh air to mix with the re-circulating air in each studio.

Humidity is very important in studios where speech is concerned, presenters will be on duty for several hours and, during holiday times and unexpected illness, often work extended shifts. To avoid dry throat speech defects, humidity levels will not be allowed to fall below 55%RH. Additionally humidity is important in technical areas where static electricity could, inadvertently, be discharged to a sensitive piece of equipment resulting in premature failure.

Condensing units are to be located outdoors on the roof or external wall. All refrigerant pipework and associated electrical services are to be run overhead within ceiling voids.

Studio technical services:

Cable ducts will be formed within the studio wall constructions to provide access between the studios and other areas for studio equipment wiring. Cable trays are to be installed within the ceiling voids to conduit cables from and between the studios and Racks Room/CTA. In the studios within the wall construction, cable raceways are to be formed at skirting and dado levels with vertical accesses for equipment wiring. Skirting and dado covers are to be natural-finished timber secured in place with countersunk screws in recessed cups to provide a flush finish. Trims to corners at wall and ceiling junctions are to be in natural matching wood pinned in place.

News Room:

There will be a news prep room adjacent to the studio areas where news will be compiled and edited. The principle equipment will be a computer running “Burli” the integrated text and audio news system which also provides a fax and email interface, and a “Buddy” mini mixer work station. This architecture will provide the journalists with the ability to view and edit INN, IRN and Press Association text and audio; send and receive email; record and edit telephone and ISDN interviews; and compile bulletins to be presented with accompanying audio from a screen in the On-Air or Production studios without having to leave their desks.

Standby power plant:

Standby power will be provided by an uninterruptible power supply with thirty minutes capacity and an auto start diesel generator. The changeover switching will be electrically and mechanically interlocked to ensure that in no event could power back feed into the ESB lines.

Principle equipment:

The principle play-out equipment will be a Wave-Station hard-disc audio system. This will store most of the frequently played music, commercial and promo spots. The play out computers and servers will be built to the highest possible standards and will use mission critical architecture and methods with extensive redundancy designed in to achieve reliable operation. Each computer and server will have a dedicated local uninterruptible power supply; mirrored hard disk controllers will be used throughout. Every night all audio files required for the next day will be copied to the local hard disk arrays in each studio to provide a data path should the network fail. The machine for the Production Studio is also On-Air backup capable and the audio is duplicated across both machines and can be accessible from other workstations in the network.

The software has been extensively tested and currently has a very large and satisfied customer base.

In the studios additional play-out will be from vinyl turntables, compact disc and mini disc which will be mixed on a state of the art studio mixer.

The studio mixers will be Soundcraft Series 15 Broadcast desks throughout. These will be configured in a similar manner to each other for ease of operator training and to permit a smooth transfer of operations for maintenance and emergency transfer purposes. Maintenance patching will be achieved using Krone patch cords directly accessing all studio audio points.

Deviation limiting:

In the studio the operators will control their levels with the aid of peak programme meters “PPM”. Excess level will be reduced electronically by the automatic level control function of the Omnia On-Air processing equipment at the Three Rock transmission site that will be adjusted to ensure that the modulation level never exceeds specified limits.

Linking to the transmitter site:

It is proposed to link to the Three Rock transmission site using the Moseley StarLink digital STL in the 1.4GHz band.

Test equipment:

Broadcast Technical Solutions will be contracted to install, commission and maintain the technical equipment. They will supply all the necessary test and measurement equipment to ensure that the broadcast equipment is adjusted, calibrated and operating correctly.

Costings:

Detailed costings for the studio equipment are detailed elsewhere in the application as provided on the spreadsheet provided by Broadcast Technical Services

SECTION 10


PROPOSED COMMENCEMENT OF BROADCASTING

(a)    Readiness Date

It is anticipated that Jazz FM will go on air within seven months of being awarded the licence.

(b)    Critical Path Analysis

The application should conclude with a critical path analysis which identifies the decision points, the timescale for them and the actions that the group must carry out from the time of the award of the licence to the on-air date.

 

Month 1

Place advertisements for staff

Obtain Microwave Link Licence

Order Transmission and Studio Equipment

Sign lease on premises

Month 2

Listen to demo tapes and interview applicants

Commence Studio Construction

Finalise programme schedule

Appoint advertising agency and design launch campaign

Month 3

Listen to demo tapes and interview applicants

Studio Construction

Sign contract with IRTC

Sales staff meet with Agency buyers

Month 4

Finalise staff appointments

Locate and test transmission equipment

Agency and Direct sales campaign

Month 5

Staff Training

Technical Training

Agency and Direct sales campaign

Month 6

Dummy Runs

Test Transmissions

Advertising and PR Campaign for launch of Jazz FM

Month 7

ON AIR

ON AIR

ON AIR

ON AIR